My goal in writing this is to frustrate you . . . I’ll tell you why.

After traveling and preaching to churches around the world for almost three decades, there are some questions I’m not afraid to ask anymore. When I look at the church today and then I look at the New Testament church, there is a sharp disconnect between their experience and ours. My question is simply this: Why?

Now, it would be easy to blame this disconnect on fragmented institutions, ungodly leaders, the culture, and so on. But first and foremost, let’s use this opportunity to examine our own lives.

The truth is, the first-century Christians were the superhumans of their day, and the world stood in awe of them. What follows are just a few of their exploits found in Scripture.

No one in their communities lacked anything—no one had physical needs of any kind, and there was no one on government assistance (Acts 4:33–35).

Entire cities came to Jesus in a moment, and the gospel swept through entire regions in a matter of years (Acts 9:32–35, 19:10).

God’s power operated through them to such a degree that they had to convince people they weren’t gods (Acts 10:25–26, 14:8–18). Just think about that for a few seconds.

They had worship times so powerful they shook the ground (Acts 4:31).

And as a result of these things, they had a reputation of being people who had turned the world upside down (Acts 17:6).

What should really challenge us is that God makes it clear in His Word that the Christians of the last days will do even more than these early believers. He tells us in Ecclesiastes 7:8, “The end of a thing is better than its beginning.”

So I come back to my original question—Why are we not seeing the greater works God promised?

I believe that just like Superman had kryptonite, the church—the collection of individuals who claim to follow Christ—does as well.

Kryptonite was a substance from Superman’s home planet. When he drew near to it, he would lose all his superpowers and become weak—even weaker than a normal man. If you look at the church today—with rates of divorce, pornography use, and sexual immorality as high or higher than that of the world—it is clear we have some kryptonite among us. When you look at the social statistics, there is indeed very little discernible difference between the church and the world. It was never supposed to be this way.

The state of the church today, which seems so clearly at cross-purposes to God’s intentions and purposes for our lives as Christ-followers, should frustrate you.

Deep down, each of us knows one thing for certain.

We were destined for more.

It’s all over Scripture.

I wrote Killing Kryptonite because playing church isn’t going to get us there, and we are losing precious time to impact our generation. It’s time to take an honest assessment of where we are, inviting God to search our hearts and reveal areas where we as individuals and a church are being held back from our potential.

Rather than be influenced by the world around us, it is time we take our place as God’s people and radically influence the world around us with His kingdom.

There is so much that God has for us that we have yet to step into, but the first step in getting there is to become frustrated enough with where we are to do something about it.

Let’s take that journey together and discover the fullness of what God intends for us!


If you want to go learn how to identify and destroy kryptonite in your life, grab a copy of my new book Killing Kryptonite (and get several amazing bonuses for a limited time).


 


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